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Can cats get depressed?Read more

Can cats get depressed?

You’re probably familiar with Grumpy Cat, the little feline whose frown has made her famous across the internet. You may also be familiar with your own grumpy cat, if you happen to have a particularly temperamental one at home. Cats are known for their diverse, often feisty, personalities; some are anxious, some reserved, others inquisitive. But what does it mean if your cat is acting depressed? Do cats even suffer from depression? Well, yes and no. How is Depression in Cats Defined? Certainly cats can exhibit depressed behavior, but the general consensus is that they do not experience the same emotional changes associated with clinical depression in humans.

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Aspirin may be  toxic for catsRead more

Aspirin may be toxic for cats

Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, has been found to have beneficial effects for some animals. It has been used for conditions related to blood clotting, inflammation, and for its analgesic properties. However, it can also be toxic to the body. Once ingested, aspirin forms salicylic acid, which is then distributed throughout the body. Aspirin toxicity is a particular concern in cats because they lack the enzyme critical for metabolizing salicylic acid properly. Cat owners must follow their veterinarian's orders strictly if aspirin is prescribed for any reason. Symptoms and Types The progression of symptoms can occur quickly. One of the first noticeable signs is loss of appetite. Other signs include vomiting, diarrhea, and intestinal hemorrhagebrought on by ulceration in the stomach and small intestines. The central nervous system may also be affected, causing your cat

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Conjunctivitis in CatsRead more

Conjunctivitis in Cats

Conjunctivitis refers to the inflammation of the moist tissues in a cat's eye, which are the portions of the eye located near the globe and up to the edge of the cornea -- the front part of the eye. It can cause the cat's eye to discharge fluid and other uncomfortable symptoms for the animal. Treatment, ultimately, is based on the underlying cause of the condition. SYMPTOMS AND TYPES There are several common symptoms of this disease, including: Persistent squinting Regular and excessive blinking

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Five tips for moving house with your petRead more

Five tips for moving house with your pet

Moving house is tough enough for us two-legged creatures, but it can be even harder on our four-legged mates. Often a change of environment is hard for animals to understand, and pets - particularly cats and dogs - will need a little bit of extra love during these times. There are a few things you can do to make the move easier on everyone: 1. Know the steps to take before the move This is a big one. Before moving house, try and keep your pet's routine as normal as possible, so they don't get too thrown by a change in habits as well as a change in scenery. Also make sure your pet has adequate identification tags (or microchips - be sure to update your information), and make sure you have the appropriate equipment to transport them in.

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Is your feline feeling fine?Read more

Is your feline feeling fine?

Researchers reveal the signs that show cats will have a long life As cats grow older, it isn’t always easy to determine which changes are typical of the aging process, and which could be a sign of something more serious. Once cats reach 15 years old, they’ve entered the ‘geriatric’ stage of life – but, many live on to their late teens and even into their 20s. To help pet-owners and veterinarians understand what is normal or what may indicate deteriorative changes, researchers have published a new study that better defines what ‘feline healthy aging’ really looks like. As cats grow older, it isn’t always easy to determine which changes are typical of the aging process, and which could be a sign of something more serious. Once cats reach 15 years old, they’ve entered the ‘geriatric’ stage of life – but, many live on to their late teens and even into their 20s

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Halitosis in CatsRead more

Halitosis in Cats

Periodontal disease caused by plaque bacteria is the most common cause of bad breath in cats. The medical term used to describe the offensive odor that comes from the mouth is halitosis. Any number of causes may be responsible for this condition, but periodontal disease due to bacteria is the most common. Bacteria in the mouth is also associated with plaque and cavities. Small cat breeds and brachycephalic breeds (characterized by their short-nosed, flat-faced features), such as Himalayans and Persians, are the most prone to periodontal and other mouth diseases, in part because their teeth are set close together. Symptoms and Types

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How to take your cat's temperature and pulseRead more

How to take your cat's temperature and pulse

Sometimes you will be worried about your sick kitten. Especially with kids, we recognize what to do 1st, how to check their temperature and/or heartbeat. But do you know how to check your cat’s pulse and temperature?

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Birth Difficulties in CatsRead more

Birth Difficulties in Cats

A difficult experience is medically referred to as dystocia. It may occur as a result of maternal or fetal factors, and can occur during any stage of the labor. Abnormalities of presentation, posture, and the position of the fetus within the uterus can negatively affect the temporal relationship between the birthing offspring and the maternal birth canal. Uterine inertia (inactivity) may be primary or secondary. Primary inertia is symptomized by a failure of the body to commence synchronous uterine contractions, and secondary inertia is symptomized by a cessation of uterine contractions due to uterine fatigue. This latter condition sometimes occurs when labor has gone on longer than the uterine muscles are capable of meeting the demands for. There are three stages of labor. The first stage of labor entails the start of uterine contractions, relaxation of the cervix, and rupture of the chorioallantoic sac (water breaking). The female cat (queen) will purr and socialize during the first stage of labor. The purring is thought to be a self-relaxation technique.

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Sudden Onset of Vomiting in CatsRead more

Sudden Onset of Vomiting in Cats

Cats will commonly vomit from time to time, often because they might have eaten something that upset their stomachs, or simply because they have sensitive digestive systems. However, the condition becomes acute when the vomiting does not stop and when there is nothing left in the cat's stomach to throw up except bile. It is important you take your pet to a veterinarian in these cases. While vomiting may have a simple, straightforward cause, it may be an indicator of something far more serious. It is also problematic because it can have a wide range of causes, and determining the correct one may be complicated. The condition described in this medical article can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this condition affects dogs, please visit this page in the petMD health library.

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Proteinuria in CatsRead more

Proteinuria in Cats

While in some cases abnormally high protein levels in the urine can be attributed to the diet and easily modified, other cases are represented by a more serious underlying medical condition. Proteinuria is one of those cases and is detected through a urine test. Proteinuria can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn how this disease affects dogs, please visit this page in the PetMD health library. Symptoms and Types Other than the abnormally high protein levels in the urine, there are often no symptoms associated with proteinuria. In some cases, however, blood may be present in the cat's urine.

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